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Inside Dubai's Plan to Break Its Own Record for World's Tallest Hotel

Dubai is not known for resting on its laurels. Less than two years after the city earned a Guinness World Record for having the world’s tallest hotel, another tower is planning to usurp its neighbor's title.

Dubai’s Ciel Tower is expected to open by 2023 and will be a staggering 1,182 feet high. It will take the title for the world’s tallest hotel from the Gevora Hotel, which stacks up to 1,168 feet.

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The Ciel Tower will be 82 feet tall and feature 1,209 luxury suites and residences. On top, a glass observation deck (complete with rooftop pool) will boast panoramic views of the city. The tower will also have a spa and several restaurants, which have yet to be announced.

Construction at the tower began in 2016 in Dubai’s Marina district, a rapidly growing neighborhood known for its skyscrapers. (In fact, you can even zip line between them.)

In order to receive the honor of “world’s tallest hotel,” the building must be entirely dedicated to hospitality. Once the opening date is closer, developers will officially reach out to Guinness World Records to cement its status as a record-holder, according to CNN.

The record of “world’s highest hotel” actually goes to the Rosewood Guangzhou. That hotel takes up the top 39 floors of the CTF Finance Centre in Guangzhou, which reaches 1,739 feet at its peak.

Although Ciel Tower may be tall, it shrinks in comparison to Dubai’s (and the world’s) tallest building, the Burj Khalifa. That tower is a dizzying 2,717 feet to its top. And even that won’t hold its record for long. Located a few miles away, the Dubai Creek Tower could reach a final, world-record-shattering height of 4,265 feet upon its completion, expected this year. The height won’t be revealed until its opening in a bid to hold onto its title longer.

 Source: Travel+Leisure Explore, February 03, 2020.